Emulation on Mac

Emulating classic video game consoles on Mac OS X

Category Archives: DOS

Preserving CD and DVD-based Console Games (Pt. 3): the .bin/.cue format

This post is part of a series:
Preserving CD and DVD-based Console Games
Preserving CD and DVD-based Console Games (Pt. 2)

In a previous post, I mentioned that two command-line utilities for making optical disc images on Mac OS X were dd and cdrdao, but I recommended dd because it was simpler to use. Well there’s actually a case where cdrdao is needed, and that is when your emulator wants game images in the “cuesheet” format (a pair of files with the file extensions .bin and .cue, rather than a single .iso or image file).

Why do we need the cuesheet format?

I mentioned in my first post in this series that many old games use “mixed-mode discs” (audio and data as separate tracks). You can rip all of their data, but without metadata to indicate the track boundaries, it seems that multi-track disc images can’t be properly handled (?). Most 16-bit era CD games were this kind of disc, and sometimes it was used in the early games of the PS1/Saturn generation.

I realized the need for cuesheet format when I tried to use the Mednafen emulator to play a Playstation 1 game I backed up in ISO format. It would fail with weird errors unless I provided the game in cuesheet format.

Almost any cuesheet file can be found at Redump.org. In fact, you can just download every cuesheet for a given system all at once, which is nice. Maybe it will preclude you from having to create your own, if you ripped your games as ISO. Note that your binary image file has to be named consistently with what is in each CUE file.

Installing cdrdao

First, you need to install the “cdrdao” package from either MacPorts (recommended), Fink, or from source. If you have MacPorts, the command is as follows:

$ sudo port install cdrdao

Backing up a PS1 disc in cuesheet format, using cdrdao

Find and unmount the disc filesystem. Observe which drive is the disc drive with the first command, and use that path in the second command:

$ diskutil list
$ diskutil unmountDisk /dev/disk3

Then rip the disc and convert its TOC to a CUE with these two commands:

$ cdrdao read-cd --datafile image.bin --driver generic-mmc:0x20000 --read-raw image.toc
$ toc2cue image.toc image.cue
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